Guide to DOU

Hey, EzraelVGC here. I write this guide to make DOU accessible to VGC players; in particular, players who have played VGC 2018. Learning to play DOU was a really fun experience, and I currently enjoy DOU more than VGC 2019 by a decent margin. A lot of VGC players would have fun with DOU, but don’t know the common sets or the way that people play the game. After this guide, hopefully you have a better understanding of how DOU works and can play it in tournaments!

DOU functions like a traditional Smogon metagame: Pokémon are legal until they are banned. This means that DOU tends to look a lot like the national dex format of the respective gen. For instance, ORAS DOU looks a lot like VGC ’15, with Kangaskhan, Thundurus and Landorus-T appearing on many teams. Similarly, USUM DOU looks a lot like VGC 18; Landorus, Incineroar, Tapu Fini, Tapu Koko, and Mega Metagross are common sights on high quality teams. Indeed, these are the only Pokémon rated as tier 1 in the viability rankings for DOU. However, there are a few differences that allow the format to be new and different from VGC metagames. Since DOU doesn’t have the accessibility concerns that VGC has, many more Pokémon are available.

First, DOU allows the use of mythical Pokémon. Genesect, Volcanion, and, to a lesser extent, Mew are all common sights in DOU. The full list of additional Pokémon will be included at the bottom, but the most used are Genesect, Volcanion, Kyurem-B, and Zygarde. Further, Pokémon can be any set that can potentially be acquired in the game. For example, Kangaskhan only learns Seismic Toss in Gen 3 or earlier. You want to use Stoss Kang? That’s no problem, as long as the other moves you have line up with it (also, it’s banned).

Second, DOU doesn’t have Item Clause. This never comes up, especially since the addition of Super Sitrus berries. Surprisingly, you really don’t want multiple of the same item on a team.

The third big distinction is that DOU is 6v6 as opposed to 4v4. This leads to a bunch of differences, some of which are obvious and some less so. For example, games tend to last a few turns longer than VGC, as one would expect. However, there are a few changes that one might not expect, and in order to properly understand them I need to explain the concepts of tempo and value.

‘Tempo’ and ‘Value’ are terms commonly used in Hearthstone, but I feel that they are underutilized when it comes to Pokémon. A tempo play is a play that takes advantage of the situation to do damage. A value play is a play that sets up better situations, i.e. creates more value for the player making it. A tempo play might be using Rock Slide with your Scarf Landorus to hit a Charizard or doubling a slot to hit a switch in safely. A value play might be setting up speed control, boosting your stats, setting up a status like Toxic or Paralysis, or switching for better positioning.

In DOU, value is more valuable and accessible than it is in VGC.

Value is better relative to tempo in DOU than in VGC for a number of reasons. First, any individual instance of damage is less valuable because it represents a smaller fraction of a team’s overall health, so any individual tempo play progresses the game less. Second, teams can afford to run more value generating Pokémon. Normally in VGC, you have to bring a high amount of damage dealers to a game. However, because you can bring more Pokémon to a game in DOU, value generating Pokémon are a smaller fraction of the Pokémon you have in a game, which means you can have more of them on your team.

When games last longer and each individual instance of damage is less meaningful, games are, to me, more interesting. Not that every game should be a stall fest, but the ability to find many different ways to accrue value with your Pokémon, play around different conditions, and not immediately lose to certain board positions is very gratifying. There are a few ways this value skew shows up in DOU, and I’ll give some examples

First, hard Trick Room is a more compelling archetype in DOU than it is in VGC. A player using hard TR got to finals of Seasonals (a community individual tournament) by using it in many games, and it has gotten wins across a bunch of different SPL matches. Part of what makes hard TR better in DOU is that you can bring more TR setters to each game without sacrificing your overall damage potential. For instance, a common team would be something like: Diancie, Scrafty, Bulu, M-Camerupt, Stakataka, Porygon2. The team maintains its high offensive peaks with Camerupt and Bulu, but the structure of the mons you bring to a game is a bit different. For Gavin’s hard TR team in 2017, consisting of Mimikyu, Porygon2, Magnezone, Hariyama, Snorlax, and Araquanid, he only had 2 setters and you were usually forced to bring them both if you didn’t want to lose. Your damage output would often be limited, or a bit more limited to the one truly offensive Pokémon you could bring (Hariyama frequently had to be brought to set up TR). Otherwise, you might forgo the second Trick Room and try to win in 5 turns. For the Camel team, on the other hand, it is simpler to preserve the setters and get TR up again. This is in part because every game the team brings all of its damage dealers, and there’s less trade off to bringing setters and the dealers at the same time.

Second, Chansey is viable in DOU when it was not viable in VGC 18 (note: Guard Split doesn’t count). Chansey is at its core a value-oriented Pokémon: Chansey doesn’t put out much offensive pressure and instead gets most of its value from taking attacks, healing the damage off and exerting defensive pressure. Chansey can do chip with Seismic Toss and put things on timers with Toxic, but mostly Chansey generates value as a late game win condition. Chansey didn’t work in VGC 18 for two main reasons. First, Incineroar was pretty much ubiquitous across the format. Bringing Chansey into a game meant that you were bringing it against a Pokémon that had Knock Off and was 25% of your opponent’s brought Pokémon. Second, if your opponent had 3 physical attackers and 3 special attackers, there is a decent chance they would bring all 3 physical attackers in order to deal with Chansey, leaving you fighting 3 v 4, as Chansey would be pretty useless. DOU changes things for Chansey for a few reasons.
First, physical attackers are a smaller fraction of your opponent’s brought Pokémon because they have to bring all 6 Pokémon on their team. For standard teams with a roughly even split of physical and special attackers, half of the Pokémon your opponent brings to the game will be physical attackers, as opposed to the 75% of VGC. This has several benefits for Chansey. First it means that there are fewer Pokémon that it is necessary to deal with before Chansey wins the game. For reference, check out this game that I played vs. Human where all I had to do was take out the Incineroar and Chansey won. Of course, this game slightly exaggerates Chansey’s usefulness; Chansey is good and not broken. But it is a game that couldn’t have happened in VGC. If we had to choose 4 mons, Human would have just brought Zygarde Incin Kart and Latias, and Chansey would have had a hard time doing anything.
The second benefit for Chansey is that there are far more likely to be positions where your opponent has two special attackers out than there are in a VGC game. This allows Chansey to act as a defensive pivot in some positions, and to be more useful overall.

Third, Chansey has a lot of value generating moves that are very powerful in DOU despite being less powerful in VGC. Chansey has access to Toxic, Heal Pulse, Stealth Rock, and Icy Wind, most of which are solid options on it. Stealth Rock in particular is very strong; having access to it gives Chansey a niche on teams that don’t want to use Landorus as their Rocker but still want Rocks up.

While I have spent a long time talking about Chansey in particular, the factors that make Chansey good apply to a few more Pokémon. Gothitelle without Snorlax, fully support oriented Tapu Fini, support Volcarona, and Mew are all good Pokémon that don’t provide as much tempo as you would expect from a Pokémon in VGC, but are still powerful in DOU.

Finally, and most interestingly, Stealth Rock is very powerful in DOU. Many people have tried to make Stealth Rock work as a move in VGC and they have, without exception, failed to make a dent on the metagame. In contrast, Stealth Rock is one of the most powerful moves in DOU and sees play on most common teams. It’s hard to explain precisely why Stealth Rock is so good, but I’ll do my best. Because your opponent brings 6 Pokémon as opposed to 4, Stealth Rock ends up doing a bunch of damage over time. It really affects your 2HKO calcs and your ability to switch when you take an extra 12.5% (or 25%, or even 50%) every time you switch in. SR creates more avenues for bulky teams to do damage while maintaining their health, take knockouts on weakened Pokémon, and be generally useful. However, SR becomes far less powerful as the game goes on, unless you are using it to take knockouts on weakened Pokémon in the back. This is because SR is a value move, and tempo becomes more valuable as the game goes on.

Two side notes about Stealth Rock. First, Stealth Rock can sometimes be used to take these knockouts because preserving low HP Pokémon is more valuable in DOU than it is in VGC, as switch ins tend to be more safe and low HP Pokémon have more chances to get utility above and beyond sacking them to get health on the Pokémon you would switch in.

Second, SR being so common has led to a not insignificant amount of Defog and Rapid Spin usage. In case you were not aware, if you Defog your partner, it will remove the hazards from your side of the field and not your opponent’s side of the field. Just another small wrinkle to DOU.

Now, while value is more valuable/accessible in DOU than it is in VGC, not all value generating moves are equal. Tailwind does less in DOU than it does in VGC, as the amount of time speed is doubled is a smaller fraction of the game. However, because there is more time in the game and more positions to consider, there are more scenarios is which it is possible to set up Tailwind. This means that Tailwind, even though a single use of it is less powerful, can be a more powerful move in general. This also shows up a little bit with boosting moves, is part of why Gothitelle is much stronger, how Goth Lax was so busted it had to be banned, and so forth.

The main point of this discussion is to highlight a tendency of play in DOU players, which they’re not wrong to have.

DOU players play more for value than VGC players would expect.

Sometimes when you’re playing games of DOU you feel like your switches are getting read a little bit too much—your opponent keeps U-Turning instead of using Fake Out and so forth—as if they’re much better than you. They’re not. They are just more used to needing to play for value, as making a bunch of tempo plays can lose to consistent value plays. This is not necessarily a hard and fast rule, but consider turn 1 of this game: Biosci is in a dominant position. His M-Tar faces down my Zard-Y, and his Scarf Gene outspeeds my Scarf Lando. If I make the value play of switching to Fini and Kartana, which is definitely reasonable, Biosci will be in a bad position if he goes for Ice Beam on the Lando and Stone Edges the Charizard and will need to make a set of somewhat awkward plays to recover. I, knowing that DOU players like to make value plays, instead make a very tempo focused play and punish Biosci for making the value play of U-Turn + SR. I lose the game anyway because I get outplayed in the late game, but the first turn is a good example of what I want to demonstrate.

To be clear, this does not say that DOU players will always play for value, nor does it mean that all DOU players play the same. Playing for tempo is important depending on the situation in DOU, and similarly for value in VGC. It’s merely a question as to the type of plays that get made in general. People tend to read switches a little bit more than they do in VGC, because they have to.

Finally, separate from this discussion, DOU team tournaments are frequently played in Bo1 as opposed to Bo3, and when Bo3 is played, players can change teams between games. I believe that this is a generally positive thing for DOU, contrary to what one might believe. In VGC, Bo1 would be terrible, because with only 4 Pokémon, there is often not enough room on one’s team to make up for any particular piece of revealed information. Gimmicks are slightly too powerful in VGC Bo1, which is why Bo3 is important to safeguard against that. In DOU, gimmicks are far less powerful, because you have 6 mons to deal with them instead of 4, and you can include anti-gimmick techs like Taunt more easily on your team because fewer of your Pokémon need to deal damage, although of course they would like to.

Bo3 often reverts to the mean in matchups, an undesirable outcome (if all games were decided on matchup, what would be the point of playing?). For example, against Emforbes in NPA 2018, I was using Sejun Sand vs Gengar Kommo-o, an atrocious, unwinnable matchup. I was able to win in g1 because I came up with an elegant gameplan, but I couldn’t repeat my success for g2 and g3, and at the end of the day, the set went the way of the matchup. Playing Bo1, or Bo3 without team locking, as is done in DOU, allows players to reveal information to win matchups that are unfavorable, while still having tools to recover from the revealing of your opponents’ information.

Common sets in DOU in the order of the VR (specifically, their differences from VGC)

Incineroar

Incineroar tends to be the same as in VGC 18, with more potential to run Speed for Tailwind stats. A common set is something like the below, but other spreads and move choices are possible.

Incineroar @ Figy Berry
Ability: Intimidate
EVs: 252 HP / 108 Atk / 20 Def / 116 SpD / 12 Spe
Adamant Nature
– Fake Out
– Flare Blitz
– Knock Off
– U-turn

Landorus Therian

Landorus-T is run very differently in USUM DOU than it was in ’18. The current metagame has few, if any, Ground resists in the format, making it hard for Landorus to have partners to Earthquake next to. Keeping Earthquake just for Tectonic Rage or for cleaning late game is less effective because you need to be able to use Landorus in the mid game, and often protecting next to it is difficult to set up. Landorus is therefore used most frequently as an early-midgame bulky pivot that sets up Stealth Rock and has Ground coverage. Common items include Super Sitrus Berry, Yache Berry, and Choice Scarf.

Landorus-Therian @ Mago Berry/Yache Berry
Ability: Intimidate
EVs: 248 HP / 44 Def / 4 SpA / 4 SpD / 208 Spe
Modest Nature
– Earth Power
– Hidden Power Ice/Stone Edge
– Stealth Rock
– U-turn

Landorus-Therian @ Choice Scarf
Ability: Intimidate
EVs: 216 HP / 12 Def / 120 SpA / 4 SpD / 156 Spe
Timid Nature
– Earth Power
– U-turn
– Stone Edge
– Stealth Rock

Landorus-Therian @ Choice Scarf
Ability: Intimidate
EVs: 248 HP / 48 Atk / 212 Spe
Adamant Nature
– Earthquake
– U-turn
– Rock Slide
– Stealth Rock

Mega Metagross

Metagross gets run very similar to the way it did in VGC ’18. It has Iron Head, a way to hit Incin, and a coverage move. Most Metagross are max speed max attack, but some have extra bulk investment.

Metagross-Mega @ Metagrossite
Ability: Tough Claws
EVs: 252 Atk / 4 SpD / 252 Spe
Jolly Nature
– Iron Head
– Stomping Tantrum/Hammer Arm
– Ice Punch/Zen Headbutt
– Protect

Tapu Fini

Tapu Fini can run many sets in DOU, as in VGC. Notably, a few sets are entirely absent from Fini’s repertoire: it never runs Waterium Z or Choice Specs in DOU. Fini almost exclusively run Super Sitrus Berry, with a few potentially running Choice Scarf. Fini is usually Calm Mind with STABs, but many Fini run a completely supportive set, with moves like Nature’s Madness, Taunt, Defog, Icy Wind, and Heal Pulse, among others.

Tapu Fini @ Wiki Berry
Ability: Misty Surge
EVs: 252 HP / 60 Def / 108 SpA / 56 SpD / 32 Spe
Modest Nature
IVs: 0 Atk
– Moonblast
– Muddy Water
– Calm Mind
– Protect

Tapu Fini @ Wiki Berry
Ability: Misty Surge
EVs: 252 HP / 164 Def / 76 SpA / 16 SpD
Calm Nature
IVs: 0 Atk
– Moonblast
– Defog
– Scald
– Taunt

Tapu Koko

Tapu Koko functions pretty much the same as it did in VGC 18: max Speed Electrium/Life Orb is the most common set, with bulky Koko being possible on certain teams but not common at all. Specs Koko sees use on Rain and that’s pretty much it.

Tapu Koko @ Life Orb/Electrium Z
Ability: Electric Surge
EVs: 4 HP / 252 SpA / 252 Spe
Timid Nature
IVs: 0 Atk
– Volt Switch
– Thunderbolt
– Dazzling Gleam
– Protect

Mega Charizard-Y

Charizard Y is usually offensive, as it was in ’18. Heat Wave is pretty much mandatory and Overheat is really nice to pick up knockouts after chip; switching Charizard out is less punishing in DOU than in VGC. Tailwind and Solar Beam are common choices for the last moveslot, and Overheat is potentially droppable.

Charizard-Mega-Y @ Charizardite Y
Ability: Drought
EVs: 252 SpA / 4 SpD / 252 Spe
Timid Nature
IVs: 0 Atk
– Heat Wave
– Overheat
– Tailwind/ Solar Beam
– Protect

Charizard-Mega-Y @ Charizardite Y
Ability: Drought
EVs: 252 HP / 40 SpA / 216 Spe
Modest Nature
IVs: 0 Atk
– Overheat
– Heat Wave
– Tailwind
– Protect

Genesect

We finally get to the first new Pokémon, Genesect. Genesect and Kartana often vie for slots on teams, with both of them being fast Steels with a 4x weakness to Fire. However, they perform completely different roles. Genesect mainly provides Ice/Fire coverage and pivoting, using U-turn to get into good positions, but aggressively thanks to its Download boosts. Genesect can run either Choice Scarf or Assault Vest, but Scarf is by far the more common set, especially since it outspeeds Scarf Lando. Genesect U-turns super frequently, so don’t be afraid to be aggressive (but I urge caution).

Genesect @ Choice Scarf
Ability: Download
EVs: 4 HP / 252 Atk / 252 Spe
Hasty Nature
– U-turn
– Iron Head
– Ice Beam
– Flamethrower

Genesect @ Assault Vest
Ability: Download
EVs: 144 HP / 112 Atk / 24 SpD / 228 Spe
Hasty Nature
– U-turn
– Iron Head
– Ice Beam
– Flamethrower

Kartana

Kartana does mainly the same thing as in ’18: support, nuke, and murder Fini. Bulky sets are the norm, with Sash Kart being pretty much nonexistent, especially with SR in the format. Tailwind and Sub are both good 4th moves on Kartana. Super Sitrus Berry and Z (Grass and Fighting) are the main items (Sash gets no use because of entry hazards and general lack of utility).

Kartana @ Aguav Berry
Ability: Beast Boost
EVs: 112 HP / 252 SpD / 144 Spe
Jolly Nature
– Leaf Blade
– Sacred Sword
– Substitute
– Detect

Kartana @ Grassium Z
Ability: Beast Boost
EVs: 4 HP / 252 SpD / 252 Spe
Jolly Nature
– Leaf Blade
– Sacred Sword
– Tailwind
– Detect

Kyurem Black

Kyurem-B is one of the nuttiest Pokémon allowed in DOU. It has absurd coverage and base stats, and the amount of sets that it uses is testament to that. Kyurem can run Icium Z, Electrium Z, Life Orb, and Assault Vest, and that’s before getting into its weirder sets. Kyu-B has really high stats, but Fini, Incin, Koko, and Steel types can all manage it pretty well. SR is also good against Kyu-B.

Kyurem-Black @ Life Orb
Ability: Teravolt
EVs: 112 Atk / 144 SpA / 252 Spe
Naive Nature
– Ice Beam
– Fusion Bolt
– Protect
– Earth Power

Kyurem-Black @ Electrium Z
Ability: Teravolt
EVs: 100 Atk / 156 SpA / 252 Spe
Hasty Nature
– Ice Beam
– Earth Power
– Fusion Bolt
– Protect

Kyurem-Black @ Icium Z
Ability: Teravolt
EVs: 204 Atk / 52 SpA / 252 Spe
Hasty Nature
– Freeze Shock
– Fusion Bolt
– Ice Beam
– Protect

Kyurem-Black @ Assault Vest
Ability: Teravolt
EVs: 248 HP / 96 Atk / 76 Def / 8 SpA / 80 Spe
Quiet Nature
– Ice Beam
– Fusion Bolt
– Earth Power
– Icy Wind

Tapu Bulu

Tapu Bulu isn’t very different from what you would expect to see in VGC: Swords Dance is pretty common on a TR team and Superpower is pretty much universal. Grassium Z, Berry, etc., you know the drill.

Tapu Bulu @ Figy Berry/Grassium Z
Ability: Grassy Surge
EVs: 252 HP / 56 Atk / 116 SpD / 84 Spe
Adamant Nature
– Wood Hammer
– Superpower
– Swords Dance
– Protect

Volcanion

Volcanion is a pretty potent threat in DOU. Volcanion has a great set of STABs in Fire and Water, a powerful signature move (Steam Eruption is 110 BP, 95% Acc, and 30% chance to Burn), and a really high BST. The only things that drag Volcanion down are its weaknesses to Ground and Electric, both common STABs, its weakness to Stealth Rock, and its general awkwardness. In particular, Volcanion suffers from a big weakness of Not Being Incineroar, which hurts its usage. Expect Fire and Water coverage, and then either Sub or Sludge Bomb, for general utility or to hit Fini respectively. Super Sitrus Berry is the most common set, with Wacan/Shuca and Z moves getting some usage.

Volcanion @ Wiki Berry
Ability: Water Absorb
EVs: 252 HP / 4 Def / 252 SpA
Quiet Nature
IVs: 0 Atk / 0 Spe
– Steam Eruption
– Heat Wave
– Substitute/Sludge Bomb
– Protect

Zygarde

Zygarde doesn’t do the same stuff as it does in VGC ’19. Power Construct has been banned in DOU, but Zygarde is still plenty powerful. Zygarde tends to either run Groundium Z or Choice Band. Sometimes Groundium Z Zygarde run Extreme Speed, but it’s less common right now.

Zygarde @ Choice Band
Ability: Aura Break
EVs: 4 HP / 252 Atk / 252 Spe
Adamant Nature
– Thousand Arrows
– Extreme Speed
– Stone Edge/Thousand Waves/Dragon Tail/Iron Tail/Superpower
– Stone Edge/Thousand Waves/Dragon Tail/Iron Tail/Superpower

Zygarde @ Groundium Z
Ability: Aura Break
EVs: 96 HP / 220 Atk / 8 SpD / 184 Spe
Adamant Nature
– Thousand Arrows
– Substitute
– Dragon Dance
– Protect

Amoonguss

Amoonguss isn’t super common in DOU, but it mostly looks like its VGC counterpart. Expect Super Sitrus Berry or perhaps Occa, and your usual mix of Poison and Grass STABs for damage.

Amoonguss @ Wiki Berry
Ability: Regenerator
EVs: 252 HP / 152 Def / 104 SpD
Relaxed Nature
IVs: 0 Atk / 0 Spe
– Spore
– Rage Powder
– Giga Drain/Protect
– Clear Smog/Sludge Bomb/Protect

Chansey

Chansey manages to be usable in DOU despite its complete lack of usage in ’18, as discussed above. Chansey is mainly a defensive support, with Seismic Toss and Soft-Boiled being pretty much mandatory (Psywave was pretty common when Gengar was popular though). 2 of its plethora of support moves round off the set, but Toxic is the most common choice.

Chansey @ Eviolite
Ability: Natural Cure
EVs: 248 HP / 252 Def / 8 SpD
Bold Nature
– Seismic Toss
– Soft-Boiled
– Toxic
– Heal Pulse/Stealth Rock/Icy Wind/Ally Switch/Thunder Wave

Diancie

Diancie is, surprisingly, mostly not Mega in SM DOU. Mega Diancie has problems with Kartana and Metagross and as a result tends to not be a fantastic choice. Regular Diancie, on the other hand, is very powerful as a trick room setter. Diancie usually carries Weakness Policy, TR and STABs. Watch out for Diamond Storm, as every hit (it counts as hitting twice if both opposing Pokémon are damaged) gives it a 50% chance to boost its Def by 2 stages.

Diancie @ Weakness Policy
Ability: Clear Body
EVs: 252 HP / 140 Atk / 116 SpD
Brave Nature
IVs: 0 Spe
– Diamond Storm
– Moonblast
– Trick Room
– Protect

Gothitelle

Gothitelle is one of the main benefactors of value being more accessible in DOU. Shadow Tag is busted, but Goth didn’t see much love towards the end of VGC ’18. Yes, it’s true that Gengar overshadowed Goth, and it did in DOU as well, until it was banned. But Goth really only got its jam going with Snorlax in ‘18. In DOU, Goth has a lot of utility on a bunch of teams, supporting Perish trap, but also being just generally useful. Goth can also run (like Yusei did) a Competitive set, but as one would expect, it is not that great.

Gothitelle @ Wiki Berry
Ability: Shadow Tag
EVs: 252 HP / 84 Def / 172 SpD
Sassy Nature
IVs: 0 Atk / 0 Spe
– Psyshock
– Taunt
– Trick Room
– Protect

Gothitelle @ Wiki Berry
Ability: Shadow Tag
EVs: 252 HP / 180 Def / 68 SpD / 8 Spe
Calm Nature
IVs: 0 Atk
– Psychic
– Helping Hand
– Taunt
– Protect

Mega Manectric

Mega Manectric does almost exactly what you expect it to: it is an electric support Pokémon. Manectric benefits a little from the larger party size in DOU, but recently has suffered from a lack of appropriately strong partners, often leaving teams with MegaMan without sufficient offense.

Manectric-Mega @ Manectite
Ability: Lightning Rod
EVs: 140 HP / 116 SpA / 252 Spe
Timid Nature
IVs: 0 Atk
– Volt Switch
– Snarl
– Overheat
– Protect

Porygon2

Porygon2 is, again, exactly what you expect it to be. P2 tends to run Ice Beam, Trick Room, and Recover, with the 4th moveslot up for grabs. Nothing new here.

Porygon2 @ Eviolite
Ability: Download
EVs: 252 HP / 88 Def / 16 SpA / 152 SpD
Quiet Nature
IVs: 0 Atk / 0 Spe
– Thunderbolt
– Ice Beam
– Recover
– Trick Room

Mega Salamence

For Mega Salamence, it can often be hard to tell precisely what it is doing. Mence can run a special set, an aggressive physical set, a DD set, and so forth. None of them are particularly good, in contrast to what was happening at US Nationals in ’18. However, there has been a bit of increased usage of Mence. The sample set doesn’t showcase all of Salamence’s options, but is a solid choice.

Salamence-Mega @ Salamencite
Ability: Intimidate
EVs: 172 Atk / 84 SpA / 252 Spe
Naive Nature
– Double-Edge
– Hyper Voice
– Tailwind
– Protect

Mega Scizor

Mega Scizor is surprisingly good in DOU, despite almost complete lack of viability in ’18. Scizor is often seen with Gothitelle, to trap in threats to it and conduct Bullet Punch sweeps at the end of the game.

Scizor-Mega @ Scizorite
Ability: Light Metal
EVs: 252 HP / 132 Atk / 40 SpD / 84 Spe
Adamant Nature
– Swords Dance
– Bullet Punch
– Bug Bite
– Roost/Protect

Mega Tyranitar

Mega Tyranitar

Mega Tyranitar is one of the more interesting mons to see use in DOU. Boasting a very high winrate in SPL, this mon is on the rise. TTar works kind of like a glue defensive pivot mon. Despite DOU having 6 mons, TTar manages to still put in work, with a variety of sets. Stone Edge, Crunch, Stealth Rock, and Curse are all reasonably common moves on TTar.

Tyranitar-Mega @ Tyranitarite
Ability: Sand Stream
EVs: 252 HP / 88 Atk / 52 SpD / 116 Spe
Adamant Nature
– Stealth Rock
– Stone Edge
– Assurance
– Protect

Tyranitar-Mega @ Tyranitarite
Ability: Sand Stream
EVs: 240 HP / 172 Atk / 68 Def / 28 SpD
Brave Nature
IVs: 0 Spe
– Crunch
– Stone Edge
– Curse
– Protect

Tapu Lele

Lele rounds out the mons I’m discussing, because I have probably bored you to tears with this. Lele can run a bunch of sets: Scarf, Life Orb and Psychium Z are the most common. It’s sometimes paired with Deoxys-A for a hard hitting HO duo. It often runs Scarf when it’s in that combination.

Tapu Lele @ Psychium Z/Life Orb
Ability: Psychic Surge
EVs: 4 Def / 252 SpA / 252 Spe
Timid Nature
IVs: 0 Atk
– Psychic
– Moonblast
– Taunt
– Protect

Tapu Lele @ Choice Scarf
Ability: Psychic Surge
EVs: 4 Def / 252 SpA / 252 Spe
Timid Nature
IVs: 0 Atk
– Psychic
– Moonblast
– Focus Blast
– Thunder

Zapdos

Zapdos does a lot of the stuff it did in 18: Misty Seed is pretty common, and it can be hard to take Zapdos out. It frequently runs Heat Wave to help beat Kartana, and Tailwind + Roost is common alongside that. Super Sitrus Berry is also quite viable, and I’ve seen Electrium Z once or twice. Nothing new.

Zapdos @ Wiki Berry
Ability: Static
EVs: 244 HP / 80 Def / 64 SpA / 56 SpD / 64 Spe
Calm Nature
– Thunderbolt
– Heat Wave
– Tailwind
– Roost

Zapdos @ Misty Seed / Psychic Seed
Ability: Static
EVs: 244 HP / 80 Def / 16 SpA / 104 SpD / 64 Spe
Calm Nature
– Thunderbolt
– Heat Wave
– Tailwind
– Roost

One comment

  1. we need more guide like these for a lot of good metagame like monotype, and other singles metagame!

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