2019 World Cup of VGC Hub

AnnouncementDetailsTeamsStandingsPairingsStatistics

It’s been yet another packed year, and the Pokémon World Championships are once more behind us. We at Trainer Tower are excited to announce that, come September, we’ll be hosting the next season of the Pokémon World Cup of VGC!

In just four months’ time, VGC will be leaving the 3DS as a platform in favour of the Nintendo Switch. Six years of history, during which our scene grew and changed in many significant ways, will be coming to a close. We’ve crowned six world champions. We’ve seen radical shifts in the metagame through the introduction of Mega Pokémon, Primal forms, and Z-Moves. We’ve seen TPCi make sweeping changes to our tournament structure, and further changes and evolutions will be inevitable with the introduction of Sword and Shield for the Switch.

Whether or not you’re a fan of these changes or look forward to those yet to come, these past years have undoubtedly left their mark on our scene. For this reason, we’ll be dedicating this year’s World Cup to the 3DS era of VGC and the memories they hold. We’d love to celebrate our worldwide community more than anything, and show everyone why we love (and, at times, hate) taking this game so seriously.

And that’s why we’re making this the grandest World Cup yet!

8 past formats, 16 global teams, and nearly 200 of the world’s finest trainers.

All competing for the title of Champion.

You don’t want to miss this!

Regional Teams

There will be sixteen teams to represent our global competitive scene, with each team being run by one to two managers. These managers will recruit up to twelve top players from their respective regions to compete each week. Expect to see even more teams next year!

New Format

The 2019 World Cup of VGC will be played with all formats from 2014. Each format from 2014 up to and including 2019 Moon series will be given a slot, with the current 2019 Ultra series format being given three. That means there will be ten slots in total.

Each week, every team must pick a format to ban for the upcoming week. With two teams facing off every week, this will result in there being eight slots to choose players for. Should two teams pick the same format to ban, one 2019 Ultra series slot will be removed in addition to their pick.

Additionally, teams may elect to replace 1 format listed above with VGC13. This clause will only come into effect if the managers of both teams want to play VGC13, and if they can both agree on a format to replace. If one manager does not wish to play VGC13, VGC13 will not be played.

After some lengthy discussion, we chose to implement this ban system as a means of including as many past formats as possible without harming the overall competitiveness of the tournament. Regions whose VGC scenes have established themselves more recently tend to struggle with older formats, while certain other regions may prefer them. This system allows for a healthy mix of formats, while still allowing teams to patch their weaknesses to a certain degree.

Tournament Structure

The tournament will start with a randomly determined group stage, where the sixteen teams will be sorted into four pools. Each team will play all other teams in their pool once. The top two teams from each pool will then proceed to playoffs through knockout elimination, eventually leading to the finals.

Coverage

You’ll be able to follow the World Cup as it unfolds through both Twitter at @TrainerTower and @VGCWorldCup, as well as our official website. The most notable matches each week will be streamed on Twitch for spectators to tune into at twitch.tv/TrainerTowerPKMN, with an amazing pool of casters lined up volunteering to commentate them:

If you’re interested in joining our crew of casters, feel free to contact @TrainerTower on Twitter!

Furthermore, in the run-up to the tournament, we’ll be releasing articles on each of the participating teams. Keep an eye out for these if you’re interested in learning more about the history of VGC and getting to know the managers involved!

Timeline (all dates inclusive)

Player Selection: Mid-August -> 6th September
Announcement of pools: 7th/8th September (TBC)
Group Stage Round 1 9th September -> 15th September
Group Stage Round 2 16th September -> 22nd September
Group Stage Round 3 23rd September -> 29th September
Top 8 Elimination Round 30th September -> 6th October
Semi-Finals 7th October -> 13th October
Final 14th October -> 20th October


Tournament Details

Tournament Format: Group Stage -> Top Cut (all Best-Of-Three between players)
Top 8: Top 2 teams from each group of 4 teams will move on to Top 8
Platform: Pokemon Showdown; subject to change if games are to be streamed. Players may play on cartridge if both players agree
Pairings: Pairings will be posted in the “Pairings” tab
Contact: Twitter and Discord

Cheating
Cheating such as ghosting or changing moves/items/etc on Pokemon will be punished if sufficient evidence exists. Other forms of cheating will also be punished and will be punished to a degree determined by myself, and will be reflective of the extent of influence it had on the World Cup of Pokemon. Our policy on ghosting is listed here.

Banned Pokémon
Players will be given a Set loss if caught using Guard Swap onto a Chansey or Blissey in any of their games. This decision was made on the basis of timer function differing between cartridge and Pokémon Showdown and live VGC play by official rules. The lack of a round timer denies players one of the main counterplay options against these kind of teams, and as such it’s not possible to simulate a fair VGC experience using these teams without one.


Formats

A new ruleset is being introduced this year including bans!

Formats played will be the following
1x VGC14**
1x VGC15
1x VGC16
1x VGC17
1x VGC18
1x VGC19 Sun Series
1x VGC19 Moon Series
3x VGC19 Ultra Series

8 matches will be played each week, and each team will ban 1 format listed above. If both teams select the same format, 1x VGC19 Ultra Series will be banned alongside the format both teams banned.

**VGC14 is to be played, not VGC14.5 (move tutors). Any player who shows a VGC14.5 exclusive move will be given a set loss. If the VGC14.5 exclusive Pokemon/move is seen after the completion of the set, the result will be reversed. Please ensure this does not occur.

NEW! VGC13 Clause
Both teams may elect to replace 1 format listed above with VGC13. This clause will only come into effect if the managers of both teams want to play VGC13, and if they can both agree on a format to replace. If one manager does not wish to play VGC13, VGC13 will not be played.


Points

8 players play per team per week, and the points awarded are 3 for a win, 1 for a tie and 0 for a loss.

Tiebreakers in groups will be determined by overall Win:Loss in sets across all 3 weeks. Head to head will then follow if this is still a tie, and a set between 1 player of each team in VGC19 Sun Series if there is still a tie.


Seeding

**A1 = Group A, 1st seed

Left Side of the bracket
A1 Vs C2
B1 Vs D2

Right Side of the bracket
C1 Vs A2
B2 Vs D1


Role of the Managers

Managers must submit their format ban, and once contacted again their line up of 8 players each week, and this can be changed up until the deadline. Missing the deadline (posting of pairings) will result in the lineup being the same as the previous week. The VGC13 clause will also only be applicable if the decision is made between both managers.

They will also be used in decision making if issues arise between teams. If an issue exists between 2 teams and both managers can come to an agreeable compromise, their decision will overrule mine.


Substitutions

Substitutions can be made by a manager if one of the following is true

  1. There is an issue with a players availability not previously known, and I am notified within 24 hours of the round being up.
  2. Both managers agree that a substitution is either necessary or allowed due to scheduling issues or availability of players. This can be done at any point but both managers need to contact me to organise substituting a player/players.

Extensions

Extensions may be granted under reasonable circumstances as determined by Bargens


Reporting Scores

Results must be posted in the “results-submission” channel of the TrainerTower Discord, reporting the score as well as linking all replays of a set. It is permitted to submit results on another player’s behalf.

The World Cup of VGC will be kicking off in just a few weeks! We would like to take the time to introduce each of the teams competing, as well as their managers. We’ll be releasing updates seeking to familiarise those curious to know more about the regions competing, as well as the volunteers representing them.

Plate LatAm

The first team to be introduced is Plate Latin America, which will be managed by André Fumis (@FumitoVGC) and Federico Turano (@AvatarFede) this year. Team Plate LATAM can recruit its players from the following countries: Brazil, Argentina, Uruguay, and Paraguay. These nations harbour a frequently-overlooked competitive scene that has nonetheless managed to produce a respectable number of World Championship top cut placements throughout the history of VGC.

Team

Federico Turano (@AvatarFede)
André Fumis (@FumitoVGC)
Gabriel Agati (@AgatiGa)
Yan Sym (@Sogeking8000)
Sebastián Escalante (@Sebastiann_E)
Federico Andino (@AndyVGC)
Nehuen Cabibbo (@xMashiz)
Juan Salerno (@JuanfiVGC)
Giovanni Costa (@The_One_Gio)
LH Almeida (@LH_Almeida)
Julián Martínez (@JulianEdMar)
Joaquin Salerno (@mysticbox_cr)


Meet the Managers

Federico Turano hails from Argentina, and boasts an impressive track record of past results. Fede broke out in 2016, winning both the Argentinian Nationals and Regional Championships on his hometurf, proceeding to the make day 2 at Worlds that same year. His streak didn’t end there, however! In the two following seasons, Fede excelled, going on to reach top 32 at Worlds in 2017 and then top 8 in 2018, securing his legacy as one of the region’s most renowned players. As a bonus, his hair looks rather like a Pidgeotto’s, according to his fellow co-manager André.

Fede discovered Pokémon by watching the televised anime series and playing Pokémon Red. It was only years later, inspired by Arash Ommati’s stunning performance at the 2013 World Championships, that Fede started his career in VGC. Fede loves the complex and competitive nature of VGC, but is most appreciative of the opportunities it has granted him: the chance to travel the world and make new friends playing a game he’s always loved.

André Fumis comes from Brazil, and was the best Brazilian player in the 2017 season, where he came 10th at the Latin American International Championships. André recalls watching the anime series for as long as he can remember, but also used Pokémon as a means of socialising while young. He moved to another country at a young age, and a mix of Pokémon and soccer were the most accessible means of making new friends, despite any language barriers present.

It was only many years later that André stumbled across VGC. While in the familiar situation to many of procrastinating an essay he had to write, André recalled a conversation he had with a friend about people playing Pokémon as a competitive strategy game. He decided to research it, and a particularly cunning Bidoof team caught his eye and piqued his interest. Eventually, he was lead to a video of the 2015 World Championships, which inspired him to buy a 2DS and start competing for himself.

André loves how VGC is much more accessible than other competitive games for newcomers, and that everyone stands a chance at breaking out with enough effort and practice.

Both managers have high expectations for their team and are confident their team can outdo its performance last year, where they placed second after being beaten by Italy. They hunger for the title this time around, and Fede believes they can accomplish this feat with enough preparation each week. According to the manager duo, Team Plate Latam is out for revenge, particularly when facing Team Italy.

The managers are split in regards to which opposing teams they deem most threatening. André highly respects both Team Italy and Rest of Europe. According to him, the Italian community has always been tight-knit and capable of fielding fiersome players, which has led to the success in previous seasons. Rest EU has also had a notably strong team cohesion, however, and André admires their level of preparation. Fede, on the other hand, is wary of Team East Asia, which has seen their pool of players grow greatly in recent years. He also notes that, with Sejun out of military service, other competitors may stand little chance if the former Korean World Champion gets fielded.


A Brief Introduction to VGC in Plate Latin-America

The competitive VGC scene in Plate LATAM started in 2014, but has seen the most success in recent years.

The 2016 season saw a particularly sharp rise in the number of players in this region, but the region’s success was largely spearheaded by the Argentinians. André notes Federico Andino, Federico Turano, and Sebastian Escalante as standout players. He refers to them as the Argentinian trident, with each of the players seeing strong results both within Latin America as well as internationally.

2017 was a breakout season for the region. After placing top 4 at the Latin American International Championships, Brazilian player Gabriel Agati went on to shine, proving himself as a player capable of obtaining major results. That same year, both Fede and Sebastian top cut worlds, with Sebastian making top 8 (following up on his 2016 performance where he made top 16).

2018 was a weaker year for the region, despite Fede placing top 8 at worlds. This was the result of many top players taking a step back from VGC, a trend which has continued into the 2019 season.

Event attendance has dropped significantly recently, and for the first time since 2015, Argentina saw few major results, marking the end of the Argentinian trident’s success. Despite this, Agati has continued to grow as a player, and managed to make top 16 at this year’s World Championships after an amazing season which went against the region’s current trend.

Both Fede and André hope to see more success coming from their region in the near future, with Fede potentially also making a comeback himself. They are proud of the international friendships their scene has formed. With the rest of the world not knowing many players from their area, they’ve instead formed tight bonds amongst those in their own local community, despite language barriers being an issue at times.

Plate Latin-America most certainly has the players to field a consistent team, and has shown they can do so before, but will their lack of broad success in the earliest and latest formats hurt their chances to claim the title as their own? Will they be able to get revenge on Italy? You’ll have to see for yourself in a few weeks time!

US East

Team US East will be managed by Jeremy Gross (@JZGVGC) & Nicholas Borghi (@_LightCore). They can, unsurprisingly, recruit their players from the eastern states of the US. Many skilled and talented players come from this region, and have had a strong impact upon the global stage throughout the years!

Team

Ashton Cox (@Linkyoshimario)
Jeremy Rodrigues (@SerapisVGC)
Jeremy Odena (@JayOhh_12)
Chuppa Cross (@ChuppaVGC)
Enosh Shachar (@EnoshShachar)
Toler Webb (@Dimsunlight)
Angel Miranda (@AngelJMiranda)
Kyle Livinghouse (@AnimusVGC)
Brian Youm (@7_Poke_)
Tommy Cooleen (@TmanVGC)
Case Bongirne (@CasedVictory)
Joseph Ugarte (@JoeUX9)


Meet the Managers

Jeremy Gross is a US player with a fair helping of top cut results and consistent World Championship invites under his belt. At 7 years old, Jeremy received a second-hand Gameboy Colour along with copies of Pokémon Yellow and Silver from his cousin, kickstarting his ventures into the games at a young age. It was only in 2015, however, that Jeremy started playing competitively. He was looking for a new hobby while in college, and decided to attend a local Midseason Showdown, which he proceeded to top cut. Everything escalated from there.

The best aspect of Pokémon, according to Jeremy, is the potential to spend so much time picking apart and seeking the optimal strategies. This ties into his favourite format, VGC 2017, where he felt his conscious team building choices had the most influence on game outcome. Despite loving the complexity and openness of the game, it’s the people he’s met through VGC that he appreciates the most.

US East’s co-captain is Nicholas Borghi, a player with similar results to his partner and a consistent record of earning World Invites and occasional top cut placements at Regional Championships. Like many others, he discovered Pokémon at a young age through the televised anime series. His first step into VGC was in 2012, when his friend brought him along to the Philadelphia Regional Championships. He really enjoyed the experience, and has stuck around ever since. When not competing, Nick can be found helping Trainer Tower and its various endeavours.

Both Jeremy and Nick are in it to win it, but know the difficulty of accomplishing this feat. Jeremy expects it to be a demanding task, but believes his roster is capable of pulling it off this year. They view the other US teams as well as Italy as the biggest threats. According to Jeremy, US West in particular is a team they need to be wary of, having put together an exceptionally strong roster this year. He praises the accomplishments of US players in the past years, saying that the results speak for themselves. Nick is keeping an eye out for Italy due to their remarkable consistency throughout previous seasons.


A Brief Introduction to VGC in US East

The east of the US has historically been one of the strongest regions in VGC. In early formats, the local Eastern scene was smaller, but saw a number of individuals shine. VGC 2013 saw Enosh Shachar placing 2nd at the US National Championships, with Toler Webb going on to win the entire event in 2015.

Many more have since risen to prominence in the region, especially in recent years. Their players had numerous consistent top cut placements throughout 2016, and VGC 2017 had Ashton Cox winning an International Championship and Tommy Cooleen top cutting three of them back to back. VGC 2018 saw Jeremy Rodrigues win an International Championship, and this year saw Ashton Cox go on to become the first player to win two International Championships, in addition to a new star, Kyle Livinghouse, taking the stage and cutting the North American International Championships. US East also almost always has strong representation at the World Championships, with three players earning the stipend to compete in Day 2 of the tournament in this year alone.

Jeremy believes that his region is home to two of the most skilled local scenes: that of the New York and Maryland area. Attendance is still going strong and isn’t showing signs of dropping in the near future.

With 10 National and International Championship top cut players, Team US East has definitely got a solid and experienced line up. One thing is certain: US East is ready to defend their reputation and stake their claim as the strongest US team!

Rest of Europe

Managing team Rest of Europe once more are the familiar duo Eduardo Cunha (@MeninoJardim) & Andres Escobosa (@_000aj)! They can recruit their players from a broad variety of European countries: all with the exception of the United Kingdom, Germany, Spain, and Italy. Despite these powerhouse scenes being beyond their recruitment pool, many talented players can be found competing at the highest level from the other European nations.

Team

Eduardo Cunha (@MeninoJardim)
Rob Akershoek (@ApplePieVGC)
Alekso Letexier (@alekso_poke)
Bartosz Ekiert (@NaociakVGC)
Alexandre Lissardy (@RadiumH3)
Kossay Amrane (@YaleVGC)
Szymon Wojdat (@Szymoninho)
Nils Dunlop (@Invicnati)
Hippolyte Bernard (@RedsilverVGC)
Roel van der Heijden (@KetchupplantVGC)
Ben Grissmer (@chefVGC)
David Mizrahi (@PlatypusVGC)


Eduardo Cunha is an accomplished Portugese player with an impressive collection of results to his name. He made the top 4 at the World Championships in 2016, has 3 International Championships day 2 results to his name as well having won the Oceania International Championships this year and then going on to make top 16 at Worlds. Not many players can display the same level of consistency and technical knowledge of the game as Edu.

He made his splash on the world stage at the 2016 World Championships, coming 4th after an otherwise lackluster year and going in with low expectations. Following this performance, Edu set out to prove his result was not a fluke and show the world that he deserved it. This drive propelled him to the level of play he now controls, and many more future successes.

Eduardo enjoys everything about the Pokémon games. Everything from the individual creatures he trains and the stories of mystery they tell to the competitive nature is beloved to Edu. As a Pokémon fanatic, he knew about VGC for a while, but only started to truly compete and look into it during 2013, falling in love with the official circuit right away. The depth of trying to solve an endlessly large problem has held him captive ever since.

Rest of Europe’s other manager is Dutch veteran Andres Escobosa, the only Dutch player to have earned a Day 2 World Championship invite… had South Africa not existed. Nonetheless, Andres is a familiar face to those in the European community, and can be found competing in many of Europe’s tournaments. Although his results are overshadowed by those of his co-manager Edu, they’re nothing to be sniffed at. He has top cut a plethora of events across many formats since the early days of the competitive circuit. Andres has a concise and thorough understanding of the game, so no matter how often he may label himself washed up, he’s an opponent to be wary of.

Andres was introduced to Pokémon by his older brother and loved the concept of a turn-based RPG with a surprising level of depth in the details. He stumbled across VGC in 2013, having seen the World Championships stream, and decided to give it a shot at the German National Championships the very next year. Although Andres appreciates the complexity of the game, it’s ultimately the friends he made along the way which have kept him going.

Both Edu and Andres believe their team has a fair shot of getting far in the World Cup. Their team spirit and experience is above that of other teams in their eyes. Italy strikes both of them as a team to be wary of, with Andres even going as far as saying that the country could even probably field two competitive teams. Japan is also scary according to the Dutchman, despite never having made play-offs. There also exists a friendly rivalry with Team US West, having been in the same pool as Rest of Europe frequently in previous seasons.


A Brief History of VGC in Rest of Europe

The players in Rest of Europe have always struggled to make a name for themselves in the competitive scene, always being overshadowed by the “big 4”, consisting of the United Kingdom, Germany, Spain, and Italy. Only one in four players earning a Day 2 invite this year came from countries other than these four. Eduardo states that players from Rest of Europe have always had to travel larger distances to compete at major events, thus always placing them at a disadvantage. Despite this, they have fought against all odds, according to him, driven by a love for the game. As a result, there are a lot of strong and often unnoticed European players from countries other than the big 4.

France has always had a small but consistently threatening community, which has come to blossom in the past two years. Alekso Letexier, Yale, Hippolyte Bernard, and Alexandre Lissardy are all examples of up-and-coming players representing Rest of Europe, the latter two having played in Day 2 of this year’s World Championships.

The Netherlands, too, harbours a small but active scene, which saw its peak during the 2016 and 2017 seasons. Known veterans such as Andres Escobosa were joined by names such as Rob Akershoek and Roel van Der Heiden. Rob is the only Dutch player to have ever made Day 2 of Worlds, and with a dwindling local scene it may be some time before we see someone else representing them there.

Scandinavia is also home to a small but high-profile competitive scene with names such as Oliver Eskolin, and Nils Dunlop originating from this area. Oliver Eskolin is a breakout player who earned himself a Day 2 invite to Worlds this year as a first-time competitor in the Masters division, and Nils, in particular, is renowned for having top cut Worlds 3 times back to back, in addition to making top 32 this season. Of the two, Nils will be the one joining Team Rest of Europe.

There is also the eastern European community. There are a lot of up-and-coming players to be found in this growing scene, but almost everybody has already heard of two-time Day 2 Worlds player David Koutesh from the Czech Republic. The Rest of Europe roster, however, will instead be joined by two Polish players: Szymon Wojdat, a TO and a veteran of the scene who’s been playing since 2013, and Bartosz Ekiert, a newer player who has nevertheless managed an impressive amount of Regional-level top cuts in his 2 years of playing. Poland only recently acquired the ability to host locals, causing the country’s scene to grow noticeably.

Last, but not least, the Rest of Europe roster includes two more players: the Swiss Ditto plush enthusiast David Mizrahi, who has strong finishes under his belt at both Regional and International-level tournaments (notably placing 15th at this year’s EUIC), and American-turned-French Ben Grissmer, the Shedinja specialist who managed to make Day 2 at NAIC three years in a row.

Both Eduardo and Andres highly appreciate the friendships that have formed with this underlooked but wide European scene. Despite there not being a common sense of nationalism, there exists a strong sense of community.

Rest of Europe is seeking to overcome the odds and earn themselves the recognition they seek once more. Will these spread out communities be able to unite under one banner once more and defeat the opposition? Can they make the finals this time round? You’ll have to wait and see!

Southeast Asia

Team

Melvin Keh (@ShamanVGC)
Ismat Myron (@Ismatmyron)
Low Wai Yin (@TextFont)
Chelsea Tan (@sleepy_komala_)
JS Deo (@VoidVGC)
Chaiyawat Traiwichcha (@taro_non)
Guntur Prabowo (@GunturPrabowo09)
Zach Kelly (@noneinterestin)
Yoko Taguma (@yoko_clover)
Matthias Loong (@mattadome)
Martin Tan (@mewmartVGC)
Harrold Khoo (@SkyFlyHigh5)

Japan

Team

Yuya Tada (@YTpublic)
Akihiro Takahashi (@Kaaaaatsumii)
Hirofumi Kimura (@hirosipoke)
Rinya Kobayashi (@gozira2004)
Kazuki Kobayashi (@sharuku_6242)
Ryusei Yamane (@Shinde_Klefki)
Ichigi Masayoshi (@mizumizming)
Kiwamu Endo (@alcana_10906)
Kohei Sakurai (@ChandyHolmes609)
Sashisu (@sasisu_memo)
Koji Morimoto (@rena__poke)
Shohei Kimura (@zeen172M)

Germany

Team

Michael Riechert (@MichileleVGC)
Markus Stadter (@13Yoshi37)
Matthias Sucholdulski (@LegaVGC)
Tobias Koschitzki (@TobySxE)
Serkan Tas (@ViperVGC)
Faaiz Ashfaq (@vgcBOSSfeis)
Fevzi Ozkan (@fevzioe)
Eike Gilcher (@EiMaGiVGC)
Fabian Braun (@baked_vgc)
Nemanja Sandic (@Porengan)
Till Böhmer (@Dark_Psiana)
Florian Wurdack (@DaFloVGC)

Spain

Team

Eric Rios (@riopaser)
Diego Montes (@Xx3O_)
Manuel Barea (@ManuelBarea98)
Juan Mateos (@thenotoriousvgc)
Albert Bos (@AlbertBMidnight)
Albert Bañeres (@ArbolDeku)
Ismael Aarab (@Canary255)
Antonio Sánchez (@ImRahxen)
Miguel Pedraza (@AhicodemVGC)
Juan Fernández (@NietzTKD)
Yeray Arrivi (@yerayarrivi2000)
Alex Gomez (@PokeAlex_)

North Latin America

Team

César Reyes (@NoAccentCesars)
Max Morales (@Max_LJCR)
Christian Ramirez(@Kristian_Ewok)
Abraham Orta (@abrai7)
David Rodriguez (@davidness2)
Israel Suaste (@Isra VGC)
Cristopher Solís (@CrisZVGC)
Moisés Briones (@NekronVGC)
Daniel Nuñez (@Danny_TDS)
Eduardo Guzman (@Edu_GuzmanVGC)
Jonathan Barradas
Luis Canseco (@Chaivon84)

East Asia

Team

Wonseok Jang (@Krelcroc)
Juyoung Hong (@kongju_02)
Min Woo Lim (@leolim72)
Junghoon Shin (@Azelfhoon)
Dong-june Choi (@djchoiii)
Pui Yin Kwok (@ivankk986)
Nga Hin Yuen (@SiuHinVGC)
Wu Chen (@VGC_TW_Max)
Jian-Ting Liu (@TW_Sayha)
Hao-Hsuan Sun (@TWJohnSunVGC)
Jenn-Chau Duh (@ilike282)
Siang-Cing Wang (@siang_cing)

Australia

Team

James Katsaros (@ChosenFutureVGC)
Christopher Kan
Nick Kan
Lewis Tan
Sam Clayfield (@The_Verd29)
Meaghan Rattle (@AvengedWerehog)
Alfredo Chang-Gonzalez (@ChinoVGC)
Henry Rich (@HobbitVGC)
Alister Sandover (@vivalavlade)
Graham Amedee (@AmedeeGraham)
Martin Larumbe (@BaseIN2)
Malcolm Mackellar (@MogarChu)

US West

Team

Gavin Michaels (@komvgc)
Nick Navarre (@NailsOU)
Aaron Traylor (@TBFUnreality)
Stephen Mea (@GramgusVGC)
Emilio Forbes (@emforbes_vgc)
Raghav Malaviya (@MudhimanVGC)
Carson St. Denis (@mblebrckhouse)
Patrick Smith (@SalaMenaceVGC)
Chase Lybbert (@RookieVGC)
Riley Factura (@GENGARboi_)
Joseph Costagliola (@c9_joseph)
Justin Burns (@JustMrBurns)

Canada

Team

Myles Kristalovich (@DrakonVGC)
Nathan Wright (@MechanicsPKMN)
Martin Gajdosz (@MartiniumZ)
Nicholas Jorgenson (@SpookyMegamite)
Adi Subramanian (@adisubra)
Sébastian Biagé (@SebbyVGC)
Alexandre Lebel (@WarchompVGC)
Fiona Szymkiewicz (@Yoshiandlugia)
Zhengle Tu (@ZhengleVGC)
Yihui Xu (@YihuiVGC)
Bingjie Wang (@aotobj98)
Jean-Marc Hébert (@JeanMarcVGC)

Italy

Team

Davide Cauteruccio (@dynamoon_)
Davide Carrer (@Nirinbo_VGC)
Flavio Del Pidio (@PadoVGC)
Dave Cognetta (@DesuVGC)
Simone Sanvito (@SanvyVGC)
Leonardo Bonanomi (@IlbonaVGC)
Michele Gavelli (@LordGioppiVGC)
Nicola Gini
Matteo Gini
Guiseppe Musicco (@peppemusicco)
Yuri Boschetto (@YureeVGC)
Arash Ommati (@Mean_vgc)

United Kingdom

Team

Ethan French (@Ethan_French17)
Jamie Boyt (@JamieBoytVGC)
Jonathan Marston (@JonoTV2000)
Ben Kyriakou (@tapu_kyriakou)
Ben Markham (@BensterVGC)
Jamie Dixon (@MasterWizardVG)
David Partington (@DavidPartVGC)
Taran Birdee (@AuraRayquaza)
Baz Anderson (@bazandersonvg)
Matt Carter (@Mattsby_VGC)
Sam Bentham (@SprIntegration)
Calvin Foster (@CalvonixVG)

Andes Latin America

Team

Javier Valdés (@IRNemesis)
Raul Ramirez (@RuLvgc)
Dorian Quiñonez (@Ppl_Dorian)
Gabriel Duran (@GabrielDR35)
Carlos Beingolea (@JallerCarlos)
Paul Ruiz (@Ralfdude90)
Boris Paredes (@PikaLibreVGC)
Gonzalo Alejandro (@gapf_2201)
Estephan Valdebenito (@PephanVgc)
Renzo Navarro (@Prro_T93)
Carlos Párica (@crazymixVGC)
Juan Naar (@DonVGC)

US Central

Team

Louis Milich (@UncleLouPKMN)
Ethan Simpson (@PacoTacoWT)
Blake Hopper (@BopperVGC)
Cedric Bernier (@TalonVGC)
Jake Muller (@MajorBowman_)
Kevin Swastek (@kswas17)
Brandon Meckley (@Ampharosvgc)
Mark Elson (@blueslideMARKKK)
Collin Heier (@BattleRoom)
Diana Bros (@eshivgc)
Daniel Thorpe (@TTTvgc)
Alex Williams (@weeblewobs)


Bracket Stage - Week 1: Pairings

Group A

Format
ITALY
vs
EAST ASIA
VGC 14
Nicola Gini
vs
Pui Yin Kwok
VGC 16
Flavio Del Pidio
vs
Wonseok Jang
VGC 17
Simone Sanvito
vs
Junghoon Shin
VGC 18
Guiseppe Musicco
vs
Wu Chen
VGC 19-Sun
Leonardo Bonanomi
vs
Jian-Ting Liu
VGC 19-Moon
Yuri Boschetto
vs
Min Woo Lim
VGC 19-Ultra
Michele Gavelli
vs
Sian-Cing Wang
VGC 19-Ultra
Davide Carrer
vs
Hao-Hsuan Sun

Format
US CENTRAL
0 – 1
REST OF EUROPE
VGC 15
Blake Hopper
vs
David Mizrahi
VGC 17
Brandon Meckley
vs
Nils Dunlop
VGC 18
Cedric Bernier
vs
Rob Akershoek
VGC 19-Sun
Louis Milich
vs
Alexandre Lissardy
VGC 19-Moon
Alex Williams
vs
Bartosz Ekiert
VGC 19-Ultra
Collin Heier
vs
Eduardo Cunha
VGC 19-Ultra
Daniel Thorpe
0 – 2
Alekso Letexier
VGC 19-Ultra
Kevin Swastek
vs
Roel van der Heijden

Group B

Format
PLATE LATAM
vs
SOUTHEAST ASIA
VGC 16
Giovanni Costa
vs
Chaiyawat Traiwichcha
VGC 17
André Fumis
vs
Chelsea Tan
VGC 18
Federico Turano
vs
Zach Kelly
VGC 19-Sun
Yan Sym
vs
JS Deo
VGC 19-Moon
Juan Salerno
vs
Matthias Loong
VGC 19-Ultra
Joaquin Salerno
vs
Ismat Myron
VGC 19-Ultra
Sebastián Escalante
vs
Harrold Khoo
VGC 19-Ultra
Gabriel Agati
vs
Melvin Keh

Format
US WEST
vs
JAPAN
VGC 14
Chase Lybbert
vs
Ichigi Masayoshi
VGC 15
Patrick Smith
vs
Koji Morimoto
VGC 16
Riley Factura
vs
Sashisu
VGC 17
Stephen Mea
vs
Shohei Kimura
VGC 19-Sun
Nick Navarre
vs
Akihiro Takahashi
VGC 19-Ultra
Joseph Costagliola
vs
Hirofumi Kimura
VGC 19-Ultra
Aaron Traylor
vs
Kazuki Kobayashi
VGC 19-Ultra
Raghav Malaviya
vs
Ryusei Yamane

Group C

Format
GERMANY
vs
AUSTRALIA
VGC 14
Nemanja Sandic
vs
Martin Larumbe
VGC 16
Tobias Koschitzki
vs
Alister Sandover
VGC 17
Michael Riechert
vs
Malcolm Mackellar
VGC 18
Matthias Sucholdulski
vs
Nick Kan
VGC 19-Moon
Fevzi Ozkan
vs
James Katsaros
VGC 19-Ultra
Fabian Braun
vs
Amedee Graham
VGC 19-Ultra
Markus Stadter
vs
Christopher Kan
VGC 19-Ultra
Sekan Tas
vs
Alfredo Chang-Gonzalez

Format
ANDES LATAM
vs
UNITED KINGDOM
VGC 14
Juan Naar
vs
Ben Kyriakou
VGC 15
Estephan Valdebenito
vs
Jamie Boyt
VGC 16
Gonzalo Alejandro
vs
Matt Carter
VGC 17
Javier Valdés
vs
Jamie Dixon
VGC 19-Moon
Dorian Quiñonez
vs
Taran Birdee
VGC 19-Ultra
Boris Paredes
vs
David Partington
VGC 19-Ultra
Renzo Navarro
vs
Calvin Foster
VGC 19-Ultra
Gabriel Duran
vs
Ben Markham

Group D

Format
US EAST
vs
SPAIN
VGC 13
Enosh Shachar
vs
Alex Gomez
VGC 14
Tommy Cooleen
vs
Albert Bañeres
VGC 15
Angel Miranda
vs
Juan Mateos
VGC 17
Case Bongirne
vs
Diego Montes
VGC 18
Kyle Livinghouse
vs
Antonio Sánchez
VGC 19-Sun
Jeremy Rodrigues
vs
Juan Fernández
VGC 19-Ultra
Ashton Cox
vs
Miguel Pedraza
VGC 19-Ultra
Chuppa Cross
vs
Eric Rios

Format
NORTH LATAM
vs
CANADA
VGC 14
Max Morales
vs
Nathan Wright
VGC 15
David Rodriguez
vs
Martin Gajdosz
VGC 17
César Reyes
vs
Alexandre Lebel
VGC 18
Abraham Orta
vs
Adi Subramanian
VGC 19-Sun
Christopher Solís
vs
Sébastian Biagé
VGC 19-Moon
Jonathan Barradas
vs
Yihui Xu
VGC 19-Ultra
Israel Suaste
vs
Zhengle Tu
VGC 19-Ultra
Christian Ramirez
vs
Bingjie Wang
Bracket Stage - Week 1: Pairings, Results and Replays

Group A

Format
ITALY
6 – 2
EAST ASIA
Replays
VGC 14
Nicola Gini
2 – 0
Pui Yin Kwok
VGC 16
Flavio Del Pidio
2 – 0
Wonseok Jang
VGC 17
Simone Sanvito
0 – 2
Junghoon Shin
VGC 18
Guiseppe Musicco
2 – 0
Wu Chen
VGC 19-Sun
Leonardo Bonanomi
0 – 2
Jian-Ting Liu
VGC 19-Moon
Yuri Boschetto
2 – 1
Min Woo Lim
1 2 3
VGC 19-Ultra
Michele Gavelli
2 – 0
Sian-Cing Wang
VGC 19-Ultra
Davide Carrer
2 – 0
Hao-Hsuan Sun

Format
US CENTRAL
2 – 6
REST OF EUROPE
Replays
VGC 15
Blake Hopper
1 – 2
David Mizrahi
1 2 3
VGC 17
Brandon Meckley
2 – 0
Nils Dunlop
VGC 18
Cedric Bernier
1 – 2
Rob Akershoek
1 2 3
VGC 19-Sun
Louis Milich
0 – 2
Alexandre Lissardy
VGC 19-Moon
Alex Williams
2 – 1
Bartosz Ekiert
1 2 3
VGC 19-Ultra
Collin Heier
0 – 2
Eduardo Cunha
VGC 19-Ultra
Daniel Thorpe
0 – 2
Alekso Letexier
VGC 19-Ultra
Kevin Swastek
0 – 2
Roel van der Heijden

Group B

Format
PLATE LATAM
5 – 3
SOUTHEAST ASIA
Replays
VGC 16
Giovanni Costa
1 – 2
Chaiyawat Traiwichcha
1 2 3
VGC 17
André Fumis
0 – 0
Chelsea Tan
1 2 3
VGC 18
Federico Turano
2 – 1
Zach Kelly
1 2 3
VGC 19-Sun
Yan Sym
0 – 0
JS Deo
1 2 3
VGC 19-Moon
Juan Salerno
2 – 0
Matthias Loong
VGC 19-Ultra
Joaquin Salerno
1 – 2
Ismat Myron
1 2 3
VGC 19-Ultra
Sebastián Escalante
2 – 0
Harrold Khoo
VGC 19-Ultra
Julian Martinez
0 – 2
Melvin Keh

Format
US WEST
5 – 3
JAPAN
Replays
VGC 14
Chase Lybbert
0 – 2
Ichigi Masayoshi
VGC 15
Patrick Smith
2 – 0
Koji Morimoto
VGC 16
Riley Factura
2 – 1
Sashisu
1 2 3
VGC 17
Stephen Mea
2 – 1
Shohei Kimura
1 2 3
VGC 19-Sun
Nick Navarre
2 – 0
Akihiro Takahashi
VGC 19-Ultra
Joseph Costagliola
0 – 2
Rinya Kobayashi
VGC 19-Ultra
Aaron Traylor
2 – 0
Kazuki Kobayashi
VGC 19-Ultra
Raghav Malaviya
1 – 2
Ryuusei Yamane
1 2 3

Group C

Format
GERMANY
7 – 1
AUSTRALIA
Replays
VGC 14
Nemanja Sandic
2 – 0
Martin Larumbe
VGC 16
Tobias Koschitzki
2 – 0
Alister Sandover
VGC 17
Michael Riechert
2 – 0
Malcolm Mackellar
VGC 18
Matthias Sucholdulski
2 – 1
Nick Kan
1 2 3
VGC 19-Moon
Fevzi Ozkan
2 – 1
James Katsaros
1 2 3
VGC 19-Ultra
Fabian Braun
1 – 2
Amedee Graham
1 2 3
VGC 19-Ultra
Markus Stadter
2 – 1
Christopher Kan
1 2 3
VGC 19-Ultra
Feis
2 – 0
Alfredo Chang-Gonzalez

Format
ANDES LATAM
0 – 5
UNITED KINGDOM
Replays
VGC 14
Juan Naar
0 – 2
Ben Kyriakou
VGC 15
Estephan Valdebenito
1 – 2
Baz Anderson
1 2 3
VGC 16
Gonzalo Alejandro
0 – 0
Matt Carter
VGC 17
Javier Valdés
0 – 2
Jamie Dixon
VGC 19-Moon
Dorian Quiñonez
0 – 2
Taran Birdee
VGC 19-Ultra
Boris Paredes
0 – 0
David Partington
VGC 19-Ultra
Renzo Navarro
0 – 0
Calvin Foster
VGC 19-Ultra
Gabriel Duran
0 – 2
Ben Markham
1 2

Group D

Format
US EAST
3 – 5
SPAIN
Replays
VGC 13
Enosh Shachar
0 – 2
Alex Gomez
VGC 14
Tommy Cooleen
2 – 1
Albert Bañeres
1 2 3
VGC 15
Angel Miranda
0 – 2
Juan Mateos
VGC 17
Case Bongirne
0 – 2
Diego Montes
VGC 18
Kyle Livinghouse
2 – 1
Antonio Sánchez
1 2 3
VGC 19-Sun
Joseph Ugarte
1 – 2
Juan Fernández
1 2 3
VGC 19-Ultra
Ashton Cox
2 – 1
Miguel Pedraza
1 2 3
VGC 19-Ultra
Chuppa Cross
1 – 2
Eric Rios
1 2 3

Format
NORTH LATAM
6 – 2
CANADA
Replays
VGC 14
Max Morales
0 – 2
Nathan Wright
VGC 15
David Rodriguez
2 – 1
Martin Gajdosz
1 2 3
VGC 17
César Reyes
1 – 2
Alexandre Lebel
1 2 3
VGC 18
Abraham Orta
2 – 1
Adi Subramanian
1 2 3
VGC 19-Sun
Christopher Solís
1 – 2
Sébastian Biagé
1 2 3
VGC 19-Moon
Jonathan Barradas
2 – 1
Yihui Xu
1 2 3
VGC 19-Ultra
Israel Suaste
2 – 1
Zhengle Tu
1 2 3
VGC 19-Ultra
Christian Ramirez
2 – 1
Bingjie Wang
1 2 3